Jackson County, Indiana, History & Picture Archive

Reading: 1886: History of Jackson County, Indiana. Brant and Fuller.

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HISTORY OF JACKSON COUNTY.
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CHAPTER I.*

GEOLOGY - GENERAL FEATURES - THE STRATA - SECTIONS IN VARIOUS
PARTS OF THE COUNTY - THE QUATERNARY - THE SANDY PLAINS -
RIVER VALLEYS - ARTESIAN WATER.

JACKSON COUNTY is of a rectangular shape. The East
Fork of White River enters at the northeast corner, and
flows through it in a southwest direction, forming two rectangular
shaped districts, which are, for the most part, totally unlike in
topography and geological features. In the southeast district
the country is mostly rolling, with low, sandy hills, fifty to 100
feet high. An exception to this is seen in the short range or
knobs south of Brownstown, and in the sandy-clay hills southeast
of Seymour, called Chestnut Ridge. The knobs at Enoch Baugh-
man's, south of Brownstown, have an elevation of about 360 feet
above White River, while some portions of Chestnut Ridge are
200 feet above the river. This ridge is said to be about eight
miles long and one mile wide, although in length it maybe traced
considerably in excess of this.

The northwest district of the county is broken, and traversed
in a northeasterly and southwesterly direction by ridges, that
have an average elevation of 280 feet above the plains. The
valleys through which the small streams find their way to White
River are generally narrow. In the vicinity of Sparksville and
Weddlesville, there are beds of loose sand, thirty feet or more in

* Adapted from State Geologist's Report of 1874.


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